Monthly Archives: October 2007

smart

To cause a sharp, usually superficial, stinging pain.

Posted in word of the day

thrash out

Discuss fully, especially to resolve a problem.

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My week on the web

Here are the websites I bookmarked into my del.icio.us account last week: Leopard vs. Vista: feature chart showdown Vista is not doing too bad after all. ICO (Windows Icon) file format plugin for Photoshop Free plugin that gives Photoshop the

Posted in links

knurling

A series of small ridges, usually milled on a surface, in order to provide a better surface for gripping or turning; also called milling.

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pummel

To beat, as with the fists; pommel.

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7 things I did not know last week

You can ‘mute’ conversations in Gmail so that they do not show in your inbox. Handy for stuff you want to keep for reference but do not need to read straight away. Volcanoes on low-temperature astronomical objects can have criomagma

Posted in 7 things

crank

A clever turn of speech; a verbal conceit: ‘quips and cranks’.

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tosh

Foolish nonsense (Chiefly British).

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chuck

A cut of beef extending from the neck to the ribs and including the shoulder blade.

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wattle

A construction of poles intertwined with twigs, reeds, or branches, used for walls, fences, and roofs. A fleshy, wrinkled, often brightly colored fold of skin hanging from the neck or throat, characteristic of certain birds, such as chickens or turkeys,

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crapulous

Stupefied, excited, or muddled with alcoholic liquor.

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My week on the web

Here are the websites I bookmarked into my del.icio.us account last week: At home with Jamie Oliver Jamie Oliver recipes, I tried the carbonara and it’s not bad at all. William Hundley’s ‘Entoptic Phenomena’ A photographer. A camera. A sheet.

Posted in links

grapeshot

A cluster of small iron balls formerly used as a cannon charge.

Posted in word of the day

seppuku

Ritual suicide by disembowelment formerly practiced by Japanese samurai. Also called hara-kiri.

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7 things I did not know last week

The iPhone (and many other high-end phones) have a water damage sensor: a small white disc inside the headphone jack that gets coloured when in contact with water. [via garoo] The Sound of Music is based on a true story

Posted in 7 things

huff

A fit of anger or annoyance; a pique: ‘stormed off in a huff’.

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bluster

To blow in loud, violent gusts, as the wind during a storm. To speak in a loudly arrogant or bullying manner. To brag or make loud, empty threats.

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coppice

A thicket or grove of small trees or shrubs, especially one maintained by periodic cutting or pruning to encourage suckering, as in the cultivation of cinnamon trees for their bark.

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kibosh

A checking or restraining element.

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top-heavy

Having a disproportionately large number of administrators.

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My week on the web

Here are the websites I bookmarked into my del.icio.us account last week: 6 Things Star Wars Teaches Us About Our Money ‘as crazy as it sounds, the entire Star Wars series itself offers some fantastic suggestions to get us on

Posted in links

beyond the pale

Outside the bounds of morality, good behavior or judgment; unacceptable.

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All carded up and nowhere to pay

When I heard Barclays was releasing a three-in-one Credit, Oyster (London transport) and OneTouch (cashless purchases under ten pounds by waving the card on a reader) OnePulse Barclaycard, I was the first in line to get it. The accompanying leaflet

Posted in personal, rants, technology

My unconscious mind is most driven by peace

I took Tickle’s Original Inkblot Test online, to check if the lovely warm results you get are there to make you want to buy the full report. Guess what? I’m a lovely, lovely person, and I can find out more

Posted in links, rants

culvert

A sewer or drain crossing under a road or embankment.

Posted in word of the day

7 things I did not know last week

There is no goalkeeper in rugby union. I noticed it thirty minutes into last week’s France vs. New Zealand, did not dare ask any of the friends I was watching the match with, but silently Wikipedia’d it on my mobile.

Posted in 7 things

ham-fisted

not skillful in physical movement especially with the hands

Posted in word of the day

How to do everything on Google

This time I was looking for a tutorial to find out how to allow in-cell editing in Outlook. So I found out that the seventh most popular search starting with "how to” is about the lyrics to “How to Save

Posted in technology

leeway

The drift of a ship or an aircraft to leeward of the course being steered. A margin of freedom or variation, as of activity, time, or expenditure; latitude.

Posted in word of the day